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Walking for country in WA

Posted on September 28th, by Eloise M in Campaigns, Events, News. No Comments

This year we spent a month walking in solidarity with traditional owners on Wangkatja country on the Walkatjurra Walkabout – Walking for Country. The Walkabout is a one month walk from Wiluna to Leonora, roughly 1000km north east of Fremantle/Walyalup.

The walk is in partnership with the Local Community, FootPrints for Peace Western Australian Nuclear Free Alliance (WANFA), the Anti Nuclear Alliance of Western Australia (ANAWA) and the Conservation Council of Western Australia. It is part of a 40 year campaign, led by staunch Aboriginal leaders, and supported by allies, that has kept WA uranium free for decades and safeguarded many sacred sites.

“While this walk is a valuable personal experience, it is also an action that plays an important role in the broader environmental and Aboriginal sovereignty movements. It is a partnership to share knowledge, culture and environmental awareness in a … Read More »



Non-Indigenous allies MIA at Stolenwealth games

Posted on July 28th, by Counteractive in Case study, News, Resources. No Comments

We were disappointed to see the lack of allies supporting the brave Aboriginal resistance at the Stolenwealth (Commonwealth) games earlier this year.

Beth Muldoon writes about being there, and ideas on being an effective ally. You can also check our overview for allies, and resources page if you interested in learning more.

As my tired body crumpled into a hard, plastic seat at the Coolangatta airport, my friend Nish said, “You know, I think that’s the best thing I’ve ever done in my life.”

“Yeah, by a long shot,” I replied. “I’ve been thinking that all week.”

After a lingering pause, we speculated on why only a small number of non-Indigenous people, ourselves included, joined the protest camp set up by a broad coalition of Indigenous activists opposing the Commonwealth Games.

An open invitation had been sent out months earlier via the Warriors of the … Read More »



My Health Record – Opting out

Posted on July 19th, by Counteractive in Campaigns, Case study, News, Surveillance. 12 comments

UPDATE, 15th November 2018 – Concerns still remain, and the date has been put back again until January 31st 2019

A huge amount has happened since we posted this overview months ago. The government has come under significant pressure, with many calling for the program to be scrapped completely. The privacy officer overseeing the project has resigned. They have embarked on a desperate advertising campaign, and had major level concerns raised by all levels of government, numerous doctors, NGO’s and privacy advocates. (including this thorough overview by a doctor casting doubt on whether basic compliance would even be possible for the average clinic) Of particular concern is section 70 of the My Health Records Act, which empowers the Australian Digital Health Agency to disclose patients’ health information to police, courts and the Australian Taxation Office without a warrant, if they did … Read More »



20 years in jail

Posted on June 13th, by Counteractive in Legal, News. No Comments

This isn’t just a dramatic headline. We wish it was. No, in actual fact it is referring to penalties that citizens could be faced with for nonviolent actions of peaceful protest, under new proposed changes to the Espionage Act which could declare a range of peaceful activities as sabotage.

URGENT (update) – TAKE ACTION, these bills were passed in the Lower House Tuesday 26th with bi-partisan support, and are being debated in the Senate Wed-Thurs.

United Nations Rappoteur on Human Rights has been scathing in a previous visit about our human rights record, and had this to say about the proposed legislation: “We are gravely concerned that the Bill would impose draconian criminal penalties on expression and access to information that is central to public debate and accountability in a democratic society.”

For those following this debate at a distance there was a … Read More »